Theology of Gratitude

Happy Thanksgiving everyone. I might not know what the date is, but I know its Thanksgiving Day. So today for Theology Thursday, let me explore what I believe about gratitude.

I believe being thankful is realistic, beneficial, and spiritual.

Our lives are so full of blessings we cannot always see the next one coming. We are literally blessed to the point that we are drowning in our blessings. The main reason we don’t always feel like it is we try to measure our blessings compared to others. It would be wiser to compare them to what we deserve. This is a realistic look at our situation.

Gratitude is beneficial to us in that it keeps our attitude positive. Positive attitudes accomplish more, and better things. Gratitude’s benefits extend into our health, our relationships, and our potential. If you want to avoid the negatives of life, build your own positives by being thankful.

I believe thanksgiving is a spiritual activity as well. Rightly understood gratitude is an action of worship. It’s an acknowledgement that God is on the throne and the good things in life come from Him. If you cease to be grateful your worship will likely lose its depth and stop being as meaningful to you. One solution to this is to count your blessings.

Every generous act and every perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father of lights; with Him there is no variation or shadow cast by turning. James 1:17 (HCSB)

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Halloween

Now that it is almost over I suppose I can admit it, after all it’s hardly a secret.

I am one of those pastor’s that hates Halloween. I view it as a celebration of everything evil. I don’t think this opinion is old fashioned nor do I think it moralistic to discourage association with or celebration of evil. I realize that many of the evils represented in popular references to Halloween are fictional, but evil itself is not fictional.

That is the bottom line as far as I can see. Good and evil do exist. We should not expect to represent good or to speak on behalf of God, while enjoying an annual celebration of evil